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Full text of "Extracts from the journal of the twenty-third annual convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church, in the diocese of Louisiana : containing an extract from the address of the Rt. Rev. Leonidas Polk, D.D., bishop of the diocese ; also, the report of the Committee on the State of the Church, with the resolutions thereupon adopted"



!uo 



EXTRA. GTS 



PROM THE JOURNAL OF THE 



€foenig-C|iro Annual Contention 



PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 



DIOCESE OF LOUISIANA, 



CONTAINING AX EXTRACT FROM THE 



ADDRESS OF THE RT. REV. LEONID AS POLK, D. D., 



Bishop of the Diocese. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE STATE OF THE CHURCH, 



WITH THE RESOLUTIONS THEREUPON ADOPTED. 



NEW ORLEANS 



PRINTED AT THE BULLETIN BOOK AND JOB OFFICE. 



18 6 1. 



EXTRACTS 



FROM THE JOURNAL OF THE 



Cfoettfg-€|kfo Annual Cwnixentton 



PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 



DIOCESE OF LOUISIANA, 



rnNTAl.VIXG AN EXTRACT FROM THE 



ADDRESS OF THE RT. REV. LEONIDAS POLK, D. V., 

Bishop of the Diocese. 



ALSO, THE 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE STATE OF THE CHURCH, 

WITH THE RESOLUTIONS THEREUPON" ADOPTED. 



NEW ORLEANS: 

PRINTED AT THE BULLETIN BOOK AND JOB OFFICE, 
18 6 1. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



http://archive.org/details/extractsfromjourOOepis 



fetract from giaftop a §a\Kz %&&\m. 



On the 26th of January, the State of Louisiana, in the exer- 
cise of her indefeasible right, severed her connection with the 
Government of the United States, resumed the powers of 
which she had divested herself, and became a separate and In- 
dependent Sovereignty. This act carried with it the political 
allegiance of her citizens. Their Supreme Government ceased 
to be that of the United States, and became that of the State 
of Louisiana, to which alone they owed a paramount fealty, 
and all the duties growing out of such a relationship. This 
change of allegiance, Churchmen shared in common with 
others, and it became their duty promptly to demonstrate their 
recognition of that change, in the forms in which the Founder 
of our Holy Religion required his followers to recognize de 
facto Governments. In the affair of the Tribute Money, he lays 
down the doctrine that such Governments have a right to claim 
from their citizens or subjects the support necessary for their 
effective maintenance, a right founded on the fact that the 
State, as well as the Church, is a Divine Institution, under 
whatever form of organization it may be presented. In the 
administration of Divine Providence, the Ruler of the Universe 
casteth down one and putteth up another, choosing for him- 
self the instruments best adapted to effect his ends. So that, 
whether it be Sanhedrim* or Caesar, " the Powers that be are 
ordained of God." They are to be supported, not only with 
material aid and personal services, but by supplications" and 
prayer. Hence arises the duty of the Church, on the occurrence 



4 EXTRACT FROM BISHOP POLK's ADDRESS. 

of any established change of Government, to alter her formu- 
laries, so as to make them conform to the new condition of things. 
It was clear, therefore, in the circumstances in which we were 
placed, that an alteration in the Services of the Book of Common 
Prayer, after the separation of Louisiana from the Government of 
the United States, was indispensable. It was an alteration 
forced by the necessity of obedience to the Law of Christ Him- 
self. This was felt by the Clergy and Laity of the Diocese gen- 
erally, notless than by myself. But under the Constitution and 
Canons of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States, 
there existed no authority accessible to us competent to meet the 
emergency. Section 14, Canon 13, Title I, it is true, gives 
to the Bishop of each Diocese authority " to compose forms of 
prayer, as the case may require, for extraordinary occasions;" 
and under its provisions I set forth for the National Fast the 
form appended to my Pastoral Letter of 28th December. The 
case now presented is altogether different. It called for an 
alteration in the matter of the Book of Common Prayer 
itself, a prerogative withheld from the Bishops, because ex- 
pressly surrendered by them and their Diocesan Conventions, 
at the time they adopted the Constitution. This power is 
vested in the General Convention alone. In the 8th Article of 
the Constitution of the National Church, it is provided that 
" no alteration or addition shall be made in the Book of Com- 
mon Prayer, unless the same shall be proposed in one General 
Convention, and, by a resolve thereof, made known to the Con- 
vention of every Diocese, and adopted at the subsequent Gen- 
eral Convention ." The delay involved in an effort to comply 
with this provision, even supposing, when it was allowed, it 
would have met the case, was manifestly forbidden by the 
pressing nature of the emergency. What, then, was to be 
done ? A conflict now arose between the duty we, as a Dio- 
cese, owed to the provisions of a Constitution which bound us 
to pray for the Rulers of one Government, and the duty we 
owed to the Law of Christ Himself, which required us to pray 
for those of another. In such a case, the latter must, of ne- 
cessity, prevail, though it be at the expense of the overthrow of 



Hbt 
NcU 



EXTRACT FROM BISHOP POLK'S ADDRESS. 

the Constitution whose provisions we should be forced thus de- 
liberately to repudiate. It has prevailed. And although we 
have not as a Diocese, in our assembled capacity, pronounced 
upon and avowed this repudiation, yet we have done so in 
effect. My view of the duties of my office, under those cir- 
cumstances, required me to address to } t ou my Pastoral Letter 
of the 30th January, setting' forth and directing- certain altera- 
tions in the Book of Common Prayer; and your views of the 
duties of yours, authorized you to accept and use those altera- 
tions in the public services of the Church. Of the propriety 
and duty of the course we have pursued in this matter, not- 
withstanding the effect of our action on our relations under 
the Constitution to the Church in the United States, I have 
not a doubt, nor can the reasoning- which has led us to 
our present position be successfully controverted. 

There was a time in the History of the Church in Louisiana, 
when it was not under the authority of the Constitution of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America, 
and when there was no Constitutional Union existing' between 
it and the Dioceses in the United States. The oth Article of 
the Constitution of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the 
United States, provides for the admission of Dioceses not in 
Union, on their agreeing- to accede to that instrument, and the 
Diocese of Louisiana having embodied the required stipula- 
tion, in the 1st Article of her Constitution, was admitted on 
application. 

In accepting the constitutional connexion which was thus 
established, our Diocese did not intend to impuse upon herself 
impossible obligations, which in any future contingency 
would conflict with her duties to Christ, There are duties 
and rights which, in the case of Communities as of indi- 
vidual Christians, are inalienable, and which, in the nature 
of things, must always be reserved. In the case under con- 
sideration, the duty we have performed and the right to 
perform it, are of that character ; and to discharge the former, 
we have been obliged to resume the latter. And thus having 
the exercise of our original powers remitted lis, we have been 



6 EXTRACT FROM BISHOP POLK'S ADDRESS. 

forced, whether we would or not, into the position of Diocesan 
Independence. 

It will be perceived, then, that our ecclesiastical position 
results from the political action of the State of Louisiana in 
separating herself from the Federal Government of the United 
States; and from the effect of that action on the provisions of 
the Constitution of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the 
United States. Not that it has been accomplished by any act 
of the Legislature of the State in an attempt to exercise direct 
civil control over the political or ecclesiastical relations of the 
Church. To such influences the Church in this country is hap- 
pily in no wise subject. 

But while the Church is entirely free from interference on 
the part of the State, she is nevertheless not exempt from the 
consequences of the action of the State on her present attitude 
in Louisiana. She assumes what her duty to her Lord requires 
her to assume, that, though she be compelled to set aside her ob- 
ligations to her Ecclesiastical Constitution in the United States 
of America, she must follow her Nationality. 

It must not be forgotten that a written Constitution, such as 
that which binds the Dioceses of the United States together, is 
a novelty in the Church, no other instance of the kind being 
known to her history. It was adopted in imitation of the action 
of the States within whose boundaries our Dioceses lay. It was 
a measure of expediency, and for all the purposes it was compe- 
tent to serve, a wise one. But it was not a necessary condition of 
the Church's Unity. It served the purpose of binding the- 
Diocescs in a Union of amity, and promoted their efficiency as 
propagandist of the Faith on this continent and elsewhere. It 
thus accomplished a holy mission. And while we with hearts 
filled with sorrow lament the uprising of the influences which 
have checked it in its blessed work, we yet cannot allow that 
its presence or its absence is material to the Unity of the 
Church. The destruction of this constitutional bond, while it 
may be lamented, carries not with it the destruction of the 
Oneness of the Body of Christ. The elements of which that con 
sists arc of a higher and more enduring nature. 



EXTRACT FROM BISHOP POLK'S ADDRESS. 1 

Of the support we shall find in the history of the Church 
Universal in its first and present ages for the action of our 
Diocese, in accepting and maintaining, if need be, an inde- 
pendent position, it is not necessary here to speak. The nor- 
mal condition of the Dioceses of the Catholic Church is that of 
separate Independence. A departure from that condition has 
ever been the fruit of expediency only. 

Under the promptings of this expediency, I have, as the 
Senior Bishop of the Diocese in the Confederate States, in 
conjunction with the Bishop of Georgia, the next in seniority, 
ventured to address a Circular Letter to our brother Bishops 
in the Confederate States to be by them laid before their res- 
pective Conventions, inviting them to unite in a Convention to 
be held in Montgomery, Alabama, on the 3d of July next; the 
Convention, when held, to be composed of the Bishops of the 
several Dioceses in these States, and of three Clerical and 
three Lay Delegates. The object of this Convention is to 
consult upon such matters of interest to the Church as have 
arisen out of the changes in our civil affairs, with the view 
of securing uniformity and harmony of action. 

I have heard from several of the Dioceses, and there is reason 
to believe that the measure will meet with general favor. 
A letter just received b} 7 me from the Bishop of Texas informs 
me that his Diocese, at its late Convention accepted the 
invitation and elected the requisite Delegates. 

I have now respectfully to submit to you, my brethren, the 
proposal to unite on this measure. It cannot but be regarded 
as one of prudence and wisdom. And I humbly trust it may 
lead to such action as may secure to us all the freedom neces- 
sary to Diocesan Efficiency and all the Union which is de- 
manded for the wisest application of our energies and 
resources. 



^jpmfe to t\\t Siskp's %&&tm. 



CIRCULAR OF DECEMBER 29, 1860. 

The Clergy of the Diocese of Louisiana are requested to use 
the following Prayer, on the day appointed by the President of 
the United States, as a day of fasting - , humiliation and prayer; 
and at such other times as may seem advisable during the 
existing emergency. 

LEONIDAS POLK, 
Bishop of the Diocese of Louisiana. 
New Orleans, Dee. 29, 1800. 



P R A Y E 11 . 

Oli Almighty God, the Fountain of all wisdom, and the Helper 
of all who call upon Thee: We, thy unworthy servants, under 
a deep sense of the difficulties and dangers by which we are 
now surrounded, turn our hearts to Thee in earnest supplication 
and prayer. We humble ourselves before Thee ; we confess 
that as a nation and as individuals, we have grievously 
offended Thee; and that our sins have justly provoked thy 
wrath and indignation against us. Peal not with us, Oh Lord, 
according to our iniquities, but according to thy great and 
tender mercies, and forgive us all that is past. Turn thine 
anger from us, and visit us not with those evils we most justly 
have deserved. Guide and direct us in all our consultations ; 
save us from all ignorance, error, pride and prejudice; and if 
it please thee, compose and heal the divisions which disturb 
us. Or else, if in thy good providence it be otherwise ap- 
pointed, grant, we beseech Thee, that the spirit of wisdom and 
moderation may preside over our councils, that the just 



APPENDIX TO THE BISHOP'S ADDRESS. 9 

rights of all may be maintained and accorded, and the blessings 
of peace preserved to ns and our children throughout all genera- 
tions. All which we ask through the merits and mediation of 
our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. — Amen. 



PASTOEAL LETTER OF JANUARY 30, 1861. 

To the Clergy and Laity of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 
the Diocese of Louisiana: 

My Beloved Brethren — The State of Louisiana having, by a 
formal ordinance, through her Delegates in Convention assem- 
bled, withdrawn herself from all further connection with the 
United States of America, and constituted herself a separate 
Sovereignty, has, by that act, removed our Diocese from within 
the pale of " The Protestant Episcopal Church in the United 
States." We have, therefore, an Independent Diocesan exist- 
ence. 

Of the circumstances which have occasioned this act, it may 
not be necessary now to speak. They are familiar to you all. 
It is, however, our happiness to know that in canvassing the 
sum of the political grievances of which we have complained, 
we find no contribution made to it by brethren of our own 
household. Our Church in the non-slaveholding States, as 
everywhere, has been loyal to the Constitution and the laws. 
Her sound conservative teaching and her well-ordered organi- 
zation, have held her steadily to her proper work, and she has 
confined herself simply to preaching and teaching the Gospel 
of Christ. Surrounded by a strong pressure on every side, she 
has successfully resisted its power, and has refused to lend the 
aid of her Conventions, her pulpits, and her presses to the rad- 
ical and unscriptural propagandism which has so degraded 
Christianity, and plunged our country into its unhappy con- 
dition. 

In withdrawing ourselves, therefore, from all political con- 
nection with the Umion to which our brethren belong, we do so 
with hearts filled with sorrow at the prospect of its forcing a 
termination of our ecclesiastical connection with them also, 
and that we shall be separated from those, whose intelligence, 

2 



10 APPENDIX TO THE BISHOP'S ADDRESS. 

patriotism, christian integrity and piety, we have long- known, 
and for whom we entertain sincere respect and affection. Un- 
fortunately, the class they represent was numerically too small 
to control their section. They have been overborne, and 
silenced, and a different description of mind and character is 
in the ascendant. The principles and purposes of this party 
have long been the subject of careful observation by the people 
of the Southern States, and they have watched its rise and 
progress with anxious solicitude. They thought they saw in 
it, the seeds of all the evil from which our country is now suf- 
fering, and have not failed to employ all the resources at their 
command to avert it. Their efforts have been fruitless, and 
they have seen no way of escape from the consequences to 
themselves and their posterity, other than that they have taken. 
Of the justice of our cause, we have no doubt. Of the wis- 
dom of the measures wc have adopted to maintain it, we may 
judge from the character of the men who are engaged in sup- 
porting them. With here and there an exception, they repre- 
sent the intelligence, the character, and the wealth of the 
State. We have taken our stand we humbly trust, in the fear 
of God, and under a sense of the duty we owe to mankind. 

Our separation from our brethren of " The Protestant Epis- 
copal Church in the United States " has been effected, because 
we must follow our Nationality. Not because there has been 
any difference of opinion as to Christian Doctrine or Catholic 
usage. Upon these points wc are still one. With us, it is a 
separation, not division, certainly not alienation. And there is 
no reason why, if we should find the union of our Dioceses 
under one National Church impracticable, we should cease to 
feel for each other the respect and regard with which purity of 
manners, high principle, and a manly devotion to truth, never 
fail to inspire generous minds. Our relations to each other 
hereafter will be the relations wc both now hold to the men of 
our Mother Church of England. 

But the time has not arrived for entering fully into the dis- 
cussion of the questions suggested by this occasion, and I have 
so far remarked upon them, because some notice of our rela- 
tions to the National Church from which we have separated, 



APPENDIX TO THE BISHOP'S ADDRESS. 11 

seemed called for by the event, and because of the necessity 
that event creates for certain alterations in the services of our 
Book of Common Prayer. 

In pursuance of this necessity, and under the authority of 
my office, I appoint, for the present, the following changes, and 
request my brethren of the Clergy to observe them on all oc- 
casions of public worship. 

In the prayer for those in Civil Authority, for the words '"the 
President of the United States," use the words " Governor of 
this State." 

In the prayer for Congress, for the words, " the people of 
these United States in general, and especially for their Senate 
and Representatives in Congress assembled," substitute the 
words, " the people of this State in general, and especially for 
their Legislature now in session." 

I also appoint the following prayer to be used during the 
session of the Convention of this State, and during the ses- 
sion of the Convention to be composed of such other States 
as have withdrawn from the late Federal Union, and propose 
to join Louisiana in the formation of a separate Government. 

I remain, very truly, your obedient servant in Christ, 

LEONID AS POLK, 
Bishop of the Protestant Episcopal Church 

in the Diocese of Louisiana. 

New Orleans, January 30th. 1861. 



A PRATER, TO BE USED DURING THE SESSION OF CONVENTION. 

Almighty God, the Sovereign Ruler of the Universe, whose 
never-failing providence ordereth all things in heaven and 
earth : We, thy unworthy servants, commend to thy special 
protection the Convention of this State,* now in session. Im- 
press them with a deep sense of the responsibility with which 
they are charged. Grant unto them the spirit of wisdom and 
moderation, the spirit of knowledge and of a sound mind, and 

* Should the Convention of those States which have withdrawn from the Union he in ses- 
sion at the same time, introduce here the words, " and the Convention of Southern States.'' 
If either Convention should adjourn, the other being in session, the language used will be 
altered accordingly. 



12 APPENDIX TO THE BISHOP'S ADDRESS. 

fill them, Lord, with the spirit of thy holy fear. Preserve 
them from the delusions of pride and vainglory. Deliver them 
from the temptation to aim at other ends than those which pro- 
mote thy glory and the best interests of their country. Save 
them from the fear or favor of men. Make plain their way be- 
fore them, and strengthen their hearts, that they may pursue it 
with firmness, even to the end. And grant, Lord, that 
through their labors, under the guidance of thy Good Spirit, 
all things may be so settled, that we may be protected and de- 
fended from all injustice ; that our rights may be amply se- 
cured ; and that the course of this world may be so peaceably 
ordered, that we may joyfully serve Thee in all Godly quiet- 
ness. All of which we ask through the merits and mediation 
of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. Amen. 



CIRCULAR OF FEBRUARY 20, 1861. 

To the Clergy of the Diocese of Louisiana : 

The progress of affairs makes it expedient to direct further 
changes in the public services of the Church. 

In the Prayer for those in civil authority, for the words 
•' the President of the United States," substitute the words 
" the President of the Confederate States." 

In the special prayer set forth in my letter of the 30th ult., 
for the words " and the Convention of Southern States," sub- 
stitute the words "and the Congress of the Confederate 
states. 

The prayer for the Legislature, as already indicated, will 
be continued during its sessions. 

I remain very truly, your servant in Christ, 

LEONIDAS POLK, 
Bishop of the Diocese of Louisiana. 
New Orleans, February 20, 1861. 



PASTORAL LETTER OF MARCH 28, 1861. 

To the Clergy and Laity of the Protestant Episcopal Church in 
the Diocese of Louisiana: 

Brethren of the Clergy and Laity — I have been informed 



.APPENDIX TO THE BISHOP'S ADDRESS. 13 

that, since the publication of my Pastoral Letter of the 30th 
January, some embarrassment has arisen in certain minds, as 
to the disposition of such funds as have been usually raised 
for Foreign and Domestic Missions. 

The object of that Letter was to declare the theoretical status 
of our Diocese, consequent upon the change of our Nationality, 
by the separation of Louisiana from the United States of 
America, and to submit that status as my authority, in the face 
of my "Promise of Conformity" " to the Discipline and Wor- 
ship of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States 
of America," for directing such changes in the Book of Com- 
mon Prayer as a paramount expediency and the law of Christ 
Himself, in such a case demanded. It concluded nothing 
beyond. It, nevertheless, looked farther. It contemplated the 
merging of our State Nationality, perfect and complete in itself, 
into that of a Confederation, " to be composed of such other 
States as have withdrawn from the late Federal Union," and so, 
our Diocese into a Union with Dioceses in these States, under a 
common Constitution. Nay, more ; it did not undertake to 
decide whether a Union of the Dioceses within the seceded 
States with those in the United States, from which they were 
thus separated, would, under any form, be "impracticable." 
It only indicated the relations which would subsist between 
them in case such a union should not be found feasible. It 
took the ground that, from the terms and conditions of the 
Book of Common Prayer, the Constitution and Canons of the 
" Protestant Episcopal Church in the Lmited States of America," 
and from the necessities of the case, a separation of the Dioce- 
ses in the seceding States was forced from the Dioceses of the 
United States. It drew a distinction between Union in 
Legislation, whether Constitutional or Canonical, and Unity, 
in Christian Doctrine and Catholic usage. The former is na- 
tional, and, therefore, local, and is subject properly to such 
changes as the law of expediency or of necessity may demand. 
The latter is universal, and beyond the reach of all changes 
in political government, being that in which consists the es- 
sence of the Oneness of the Body of Christ. 

A change in Church Union, therefore, does not necessarily 



14 APPENDIX TO THE BISHOP'S ADDRESS. 

involve a breach of Church Unity. "The liberty wherewith 
Christ hath made us free " may allow us, without offence, to 
accept a status which necessity, not to say the Providence of 
God, has forced upon us, provided the doctrine of his Church 
and the order of its administrations in all of those things 
which are vital, be left unimpaired. 

The Confederation of these States, which, at the date of 
that Letter, was a foreshadowed event, has now become a 
reality. The organization of the new Government has been 
completed, and a permanent Constitution adopted. Time has 
not allowed us, as yet, opportunity to consult with our sister 
Dioceses as to the course proper to be pursued, either with 
reference to a separate organization, or as to what relations it 
may be practicable to establish with our sister Dioceses in the 
United States. 

I cannot doubt, however, that some plan will be adopted by 
which the Dioceses of the Confederate States will be brought 
into a practical union, and I do not now see why some basis of 
connection may not be agreed upon, by which our respective 
organizations, North and South, while left free in all those re- 
spects in which freedom is expedient, may continue to act 
together in such things as are above the merely local, and in 
which greater efficiency would result from a union of our 
resources and energies. 

These details, however, must be left to the developments of 
the future. In the mean season, as our confidence, in its largest 
measure, in the Christian integrity, zeal, and judiciousness of 
our brethren who have charge of the Foreign and Domestic 
Missions of the Church is undiminished, I recommend that 
such funds as may have been, or may hereafter be, collected 
for those objects, be sent forward as heretofore. Such changes 
as may be expedient will be made, as events progress, and as 
expediency may dictate. 

I remain, very truly your obedient servant, in Christ, 

LEONIDAS POLK, 

Bishop of the Protestant Episcojml Church 
in the Diocese of Louisiana. 
New Orleans, March 28th, 1861. 



detracts from tfe Journal of (foitwntion. 



GRACE CHURCH, ST. FRAXCISYILLE, \ 
May 1st, 1861. i 



The Bishop appointed the following 

COMMITTEE ON" THE STATE OP THE CHUECH. 

Rev. C. S. Hedges, D. D., Hox. Geo. S. Guiox, 

Rev. W. T. Leacock, D. D., Ex. Gov. Henry Johxsox, 

Rev. D. S. Lewis, D. D., Hox. Alex. Montgomery, 

Rev. Johx Fulton, W. J. Lyle, M. D, 



GRACE, CHURCH, May 2, 1861. 

By request of the Rev. C. S. Hedges, D. D., Chairman of Com- 
mittee, the Rev. John Fulton, from the Committee on the State 
of the Church, presented the following 

REPORT. 

The Committee on the State of the Church beg respectfully 
to report : That there is great cause for gratitude to Almighty 
God for the continued prosperity of the Church in this Diocese. 
The large number of new Congregations admitted into Union 
with the present Convention, and the number of Confirmations, 
greater by one-third than any previous year, is an evident 



16 EXTRACTS FROM THE JOURNAL OF CONVENTION. 

proof that the hand of God is with us, and that the cause of 
our Zion is prospering within our borders, 

But the shortness of the time allowed, and the importance 
of the matters falling under their consideration, compel the 
Committee to dismiss with these remarks the subjects com- 
monly embraced in the Eeport they are required to make, and 
which, in general, relate exclusively to the internal operations 
of the Church. The state of the Church implies as well the state 
of her relations to the Church at large, as the condition of her 
ordinary operations. Therefore, the Committee feel themselves 
obliged to lay formally before Convention what they conceive 
to be our true relation to the whole body of Christ's Church 
Catholic, and particularly to that Branch of it to which we 
lately belonged — the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United 
States of America; — a duty which is forced upon us by the fact 
that Louisiana has within the last year separated from the 
Nationality of which she previously formed a part, and joined 
with other Sovereign States in forming a new Nation, to which 
she and we, her citizens, to-day owe our allegiance. The 
simple question which we have to meet is, whether any change 
in our relations, as a Church, to the Church in the United 
States, is, or of right ought to be, involved in the change of 
National relations which has taken place. In answering this 
question, the Committee asks to be indulged in stating briefly 
the reasons which have prevailed in bringing them to the con- 
clusion they feel bound to lay before Convention. A brief, 
synoptical form will probably be found the best, as its de- 
ficiencies in mere detail can readily be supplied by the learn- 
ing of the members of Convention. 

First, then, The Diocese of Louisiana, like every other Dio- 
cese, is an integral portion of the One Catholic and Apostolic 
Church, in the Unity of which she cannot cease to be embraced, 
but by lapsing into heresy or schism ; for the Unity of the 
Church Catholic is Unity in true Faith and Apostolic Order. 
Holding the Catholic faith, and having an Apostolic Ministry, 
rightly and duly administering Christ's Holy Sacraments, this 
Diocese possesses all that is essential to her being as a true and 



EXTRACTS FROM THE JOURNAL OF CONVENTION. IT 

valid member of the One Church Catholic and Apostolic. With 
these she would have been truly in the Unity of the Church, 
though she had never been conjoined with an} 7 other Dioceses 
in a Union such as that which forms the Protestant Episcopal 
Church in the United States of America ; and having these, 
though in the matter of her government, she should, by cir- 
cumstances be dissevered for a time from every other Diocese, 
her Catholicity must still be perfect, and the Church's Unity 
in her regard unbroken. Acknowledging " One Lord, One 
Faith, One Baptism," with the Universal Church, there is be- 
tween her and all other Churches " Unity of Spirit" in the 
Apostolic " Bond of Peace." This Unity no mere political or 
National disturbances or revolutions can destroy, and this Bond 
cannot be impaired by any changes among States or Nations. 

2. But Unions among Churches are altogether different 
from the Unity of the Church. The Unity of the Church is 
unity in believing and doing all that God has taught, and 
therefore as a matter of Divine precept, is eternal in its obliga- 
tion, while Unions of Churches are voluntary combinations for 
purposes of practical expediency, and therefore may be 
changed whenever sound expediency requires that they should 
be dissolved. 

3. And it does not appear that in the days of the Apostles, 
or for some time afterwards, any local combinations between 
Dioceses were formed. It does not appear that under Apos- 
tolic direction, Ephesus, with its Bishop Timothy, or Crete, 
with its Bishop Titus, were formally conjoined with any other 
Dioceses. On the contrary, it appears from the tenor of Holy 
Scripture, and the testimony of ancient authors, that every 
Diocese was originally independent of every other. 

4.', When for reasons of expediency unions among Dioceses 
were entered into, it was by free consent among the parties to 
them. Considerations of convenience required them to be 
limited in their extent, and at first of choice, afterwards by the 
decrees of Councils, they were made coextensive with the divi- 
sions of the emph'e which had been established by the Civil 
Power. In every Province the Senior Bishop, or the Senior 
3 



18 EXTRACTS FROM THE JOURNAL OP CONVENTION". 

Church was allowed a certain precedence over the others, and 
out of this grew first the MetropoliticaL and afterwards the 
Patriarchal arrangements of the Church. 

5. At the disruption of the Roman Empire the Provincial 
distribution of the Church was merged into the National. 
Bishops and Dioceses in every nation being drawn together by 
the [influence of national affinity, combined for the common 
benefit, and chiefly for the sake of Liturgical Uniformity, in 
forming Churches conterminous in jurisdiction with the nations 
to which the} T owed temporal allegiance. 

6. It was with the element of Nationality in Churches that 
the Papacy had most to contend, and side by side with the 
suppression of this principle we find the constant growth of 
Papal usurpations and corruptions. 

7. It was natural therefore that the Church when reformed 
should resume that of which Pome had robbed her; and the 
fact is, that the articles and canons of our mother Church of 
England show her to be intensely National. Her Articles of 
subscription are such that she requires her Clergw to deny the 
existence in any foreigner of any power or authority ecclesiasti- 
cal or spiritual within the Realm of England, or any of her 
dependencies. 

8. Hence the Clergy of the United States, after the Revolu- 
tion, having ceased to be subjects of the Crown, ceased likewise 
to be Clergy of the Church of England, so that the ecclesiastical 
Independence of the Churches in the Colonies was, of necessity 
included in the Independence of the Colonies themselves. 

9. As was to be expected, the Churches of the United 
States and the Dioceses into which they were distributed, com 
bined to form a Church as strictly National as that of England 
After a careful study of her Constitution and her Canons, 
this Committee cannot forbear arriving at the determinate con- 
clusion that they are of such a nature as to exclude from her 
any Diocese whose territory may have ceased to be a portion 
of the United States. 

(a.) Her corporate style and designation is such as clearly to 
define her territorial limits. She is the Protestant Episcopal 



EXTRACTS FROM THE JOURNAL OF CONVENTION. 19 

Church in the United States of America. Her boundaries are 
those of the United States, beyond which she does not seek to 
include any other Churches whatsoever. 

(b.) By the Fifth Article of her Constitution, the implication 
involved in her corporate designation is defined in terms. By 
that Article, the admission of Dioceses into Union with the 
Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America 
is limited to Dioceses formed, or to be formed, within the States 
or Territories of that country; so that none can constitutionally 
be admitted which do not lie territorially within her boundaries. 
It is evident that that which is an indispensable condition of 
admission to Union with her, must be indispensable to con- 
tinuance in that Union. Consequently, when the State in 
which our Diocese is situated ceased to form a part of the 
United States, that condition failing on our part, we ceased 
ipso facto to retain that formal union with her of which terri- 
torial position within the United States is an indispensable 
condition. Had the Church in Louisiana, Florida, or Texas, 
been as perfectly formed and furnished as at present, they 
could not, previously to the annexation of those States to the 
United States, have been admitted, under this Article, to Union 
with the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States. They 
ivere admitted, because, at the time of their application, those 
States lay within the boundaries of the United States. Having 
now ceased to belong to the United States, a fair construction of 
the Article requires us to hold them removed beyond the juris- 
diction of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States. 

(c.) But had any doubt been possible, under Article Fifth of 
the Constitution, that doubt would be removed by the express 
terms of Article Tenth. The Confederate States of America 
form a country foreign to the United States, and on failure of 
the Episcopate in any of these, were we to look to the Pro- 
testant Episcopal Church in the United States for its con- 
tinuance, the facts of the case would require application to be 
made, not in the manner heretofore open to us, but as is required 
by Article Tenth of the Constitution, in which special provision 
is made for the consecration of Bishops, not for foreign 



20 EXTRACTS FROM THE JOURNAL OF CONVENTION. 

Churches, but for foreign Countries. By this Article, such 
Bishops, so consecrated, would not be eligible to the office of 
Diocesan or Assistant Bishop in any Diocese of the United 
States, nor entitled to a seat in the House of Bishops, nor 
could they lawfully exercise any Episcopal authority in those 
States. In other words, as Bishops of a foreign country, they 
could not be, nor become, Bishops of the UnitedStates — a con- 
stitutional provision evidently reaching to Bishops now in this 
position, as well as to those who might thus, by possibility, be 
placed in it. Our Bishops are now Bishops of a country for- 
eign to the United States, and cannot, therefore, by her own 
provision, any longer be regarded as Bishops of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church in the United States. 

(d.) If anything were yet wanting to confirm the view that 
the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States is must 
distinctively and strictly National, it might be fully supplied 
from the Canon Law of the Church with respect to Foreign and 
Domestic Missionary Bishops. (See Title I, Canon 13, Section 
7, Clauses 1 and 5; also Section 8, Clauses 1 and 2, of the 
same Canon.) The Domestic Missionary Bishop, whose juris- 
diction lies within the States or Territories of the U. S., is en- 
titled to a seat in the House of Bishops, from which the foreign 
Missionary Bishop is excluded. The former, moreover, is eligible 
to the Episcopate of a vacant Diocese in the United States ; the 
latter is ineligible, but with the consent of three-fourths of the 
Bishops, Clergy, and Laity of the Church in Convention 
assembled. Thus, of two Bishops elected and consecrated in 
the same way, by the same parties, and governed by Canons 
of the same Convention, the one, because his jurisdiction lies 
within the United States, is invested with the right of voice 
and vote in the Convention by which he is governed, besides 
other important privileges, from which the other is excluded, 
for no other reason than that he is called to exercise his func- 
tions in a foreign land. 

From all these considerations, and others too numerous to 
be embraced in the limits of this report, the Committee feel 
themselves compelled to the conclusion that, whereas, the 



EXTRACTS FROM THE JOURNAL OF CONVENTION. 21 

Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America 
is, and was, rightly intended to be a strictly National body, 
into which the Diocese of Louisiana was admitted, because, 
at the time of her admission, the State of Louisiana formed a 
portion of the United States; and whereas, Louisiana has dis- 
solved the Union formerly existing between her and the United 
States, and so separated from that nation, therefore, the Dio- 
cese of Louisiana has ceased to belong to the National Pro- 
testant Episcopal Church of the United States of America. 
And whereas, the State of Louisiana has entered into a new 
Confederacy, and now is part of a new Nation, therefore, as 
the highest expediency has, from very early times, prompted 
such confederations among adjacent Dioceses of the Catholic 
Church as might advance their common wellfare ; and as nature 
and experience, no less than the highest prudence, teach that 
such Confederations should be National, like that in the United 
States, therefore, this Diocese, in the opinion of this Committee, 
ought, in the exercise of that liberty wherewith Christ hath 
made us free, to take such steps as may be necessary to the 
formation of a National Protestant Episcopal Church in the 
Confederate States of America. 

It is needless, after what has been previously said, that the 
Committee should declare that, so far forth as Louisiana is con- 
cerned, the Unity of the Church is unbroken ; nor need the 
Committee frame new words to express the never-failing love 
which every member of this Diocese must always have for our 
brethren of the Church in the United States. We prefer, in 
this connection, to adopt the words of our Eight Eeverend 
Father, as we find them in his Pastoral Letters. They repre- 
sent the cherished sentiments of every churchman in the 
Diocese : 

"It is our happiness to know that in canvassing the sum 
of the political grievances of which we have complained, we 
find no contribution made to it by brethren of our own house- 
hold. Our Church in the non-slaveholding States, as every- 
where, has been loyal to the Constitution and the laws. Her 
sound conservative teaching: and her well-ordered organization. 



22 EXTRACTS FROM THE JOURNAL OF CONVENTION. 

have held her steadily to her proper work, and she has confined 
herself simply to preaching and teaching the Gospel of Christ. 
Surrounded by a strong pressure on every side, she has suc- 
cessfully resisted its power, and has refused to lend the aid of 
her Conventions, her pulpits and her presses to the radical 
and unscriptural propagandism which has so degraded Christ- 
ianity, and plunged our country into its unhappy condition. 

"In withdrawing ourselves, therefore, from all political 
connection with the Union to which our brethren belong, we do so 
with hearts filled with sorrow at the prospect of its forcing a 
termination of our ecclesiastical connection with them also, 
and that we shall bo separated from those, whose intelligence, 
patriotism, christian integrity and piety, we have long known, 
and for whom we entertain sincere respect and affection. 

"Our separation from our brethren of 'The Protestant 
Episcopal Church in the United States ' has been effected, 
because we must follow our Nationality. Not because there 
has been any difference of opinion as to Christian doctrine or 
Catholic usage. Upon these points we are still one. With us, 
it is a separation, not division, certainly not alienation. And 
there is no reason why, if we should find the union of our 
Dioceses under one National Church impracticable, we should 
cease to feel for each other the respect and regard with which 
purity of manners, high principle, and a manly devotion to truth, 
never fail to inspire generous miuds." 

It remains then only that the Committee should present this 
most important subject for the action of Convention in the 
form of resolutions. 

RESOLUTIONS. 

Whereas, The Protestant Episcopal Church in the United 
States of America, is and was rightly intended to be a strictly 
National body, not admitting into union with it Dioceses sit- 
uated in foreign countries ; 

And Whereas, The State of Louisiana has by ordinance dis- 
solved the Union formerly existing between it and the United 



23 EXTRACTS FROM THE JOURNAL OF CONVENTION. 

States of America, thereby making the State of Louisiana 
foreign to the United States; therefore, 

Resolved, That the Diocese of Louisiana has ceased to be a 
Diocese of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United 
States of America. 

But Whereas, The universal experience of the Catholic 
Church has from a very early time shown the necessity of such 
local combinations among Dioceses as might advance the com- 
mon welfare, 

And Whereas, Reasons of the highest expediency demand 
that the Church should in this respect follow the Nationalities 
which in the order of Divine Providence may be raised up, 
therefore 

Resolved, That the Diocese of Louisiana loyal to the Doc- 
trine, Discipline and Example of the Holy Catholic Church, and 
closely following the model of our Mother Church of England, 
and our Sister Dioceses in the United States, is desirous of 
entering into Union with the remaining Dioceses of the Con- 
federate States for the formation of a National Protestant 
Episcopal Church in the Confederate States of America. 

Resolved further, That this Convention will appoint Delegates 
to represent the Diocese in a Convention of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church in the Confederate States of America, to be 
held at Montgomery, in the State and Diocese of Alabama, on 
the 3d day of July next. 

All which is respectfully submitted, 

[Signed] C. S. Hedges, D. D., 

W. T. Leacock, D. D. 
Dan'l S. Lewis, D. D., 
John Fulton. 
George S. Guion. 
Henry Johnson. 
Alex. Montgomery. 
W. J. Lyle. 

On motion of Dr. J. P. Davidson, the Report of the Conv 
mittee was received ; and Convention proceeded to the con- 



24 EXTRACTS FROM THE JOURNAL OF CONVENTION. 

sideration of the Resolutions therein proposed for adoption. 
The Resolutions were then, on motion of Rev. John Fulton, 
seconded by Dr. Lyle, severally put, and, without amendment, 
carried. 



Errata. — Page G, ninth line from bottom, for '-propagandist " read " propagandists." On 
page 7, ninth line from top, for " Diocese" read " Dioceses."